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Serafini: History's repeat of styles not always a good thing

| Wednesday, July 16, 2014, 9:01 p.m.

“I remember when those were popular,” I recall my mother uttering when she'd see someone indulging in a fashion trend that had made its way back around since she was younger.

One of those trends that specifically sticks out to me is the revival of bell bottom jeans, platform shoes, round sunglasses and tie-dyedT-shirts in the mid-90s. I remember so many kids in school who were really big into all of the hippie-inspired clothing.

It seems to me that trends have about a 20-year turnaround time — give or take — which I find both fascinating and frightening, considering some of the styles I remember from my tween and teenage years.

Some of the old styles I have seen recently are at least what I consider some of the better ones: guys sporting the hi-top fade hairstyle similar to those that graced the heads of many of the early-90s hip hop and R&B groups I used to listen to, combat boots and some of the less-revealing crop tops.

At a concert last week, I was surprised to see so many teenagers wearing items that easily could have been found in my closet in the mid-90s when I really was into the grunge music scene — lots of plaid and baby-doll dresses.

But there also are some that leave me scratching my head, such as the modernized “mom jeans” — super high-waisted, stone-washed jeans cut into shorts so short that your bum hangs out.

Luckily, I have yet to see — though I'm sure they are around — anyone sporting “hammer pants”; denim overalls with one of the straps unhooked; or the dreaded teased-up bangs like what I attempted during middle school and never could quite pull off, even with the strongest of Aqua Net hairsprays, because of my thick, heavy hair. I'm sure my mom secretly was ecstatic.

When I look around today, I have to wonder what styles will become popular again in the future. Will skinny jeans, leggings and Sperry Top-Siders come around again in the 2030s? How about the undercut or ombre hair? Or will something new be created?

I guess we'll find out in 20 years.

Kristina Serafini is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. She can be reached at 412-324-1405 or kserafini@tribweb.com.

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