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Pleasant Hills police chief reviews 2012 crime statistics

| Saturday, March 16, 2013, 9:00 p.m.

Thefts and drug- and alcohol-related incidents top the crimes in Pleasant Hills in 2012.

The Pleasant Hills police released its yearly crime-statistics report, which includes a total of 268 arrests and 3,969 traffic tickets and warnings, Chief Edward Cunningham said. The report is meant to strengthen communication, and therefore trust and relationships, between the police and residents.

“Pleasant Hills and Whitehall, we're safe communities but we're not an island,” Cunningham said.

Cunningham said patrols are increased when they can be, and he asks residents to look out for suspicious activities and then call 911 if they see anything to help deter crime in 2013. The goal is for residents to feel comfortable with the police to call 911 more often, he said.

“We increase the patrols as best we can, especially at night,” Cunningham said. “If you call 911, there's a chance that we could be in the area and catch them.”

There were 148 thefts, including those from vehicles, last year, Cunningham said.

Many of those thefts are from unlocked vehicles, Cunningham said.

Twice last year vehicles were stolen because the doors were unlocked, Cunningham said. Guns were stolen out of unlocked vehicles on three occasions.

Also, there were 127 drug- or alcohol-related incidents in 2012, Cunningham said. They include 38 drug arrests, 59 for driving under the influence and 30 for public intoxication.

In addition, other crimes include 24 burglaries, three robberies, two sexual assaults and six missing-persons reports, Cunningham said. There were 421 traffic accidents, 104 of which were reportable.

There were no rapes or murders in 2012, Cunningham said.

Laura Van Wert is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. She can be reached at 412-388-5814 or at lvanwert@tribweb.com.

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