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Library Corner: E-resources can give students a head start

| Wednesday, July 1, 2015, 2:38 p.m.
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Pam Richter is the technology and marketing librarian at the Baldwin Borough Public Library. Follow the library on Twitter @BBPL, on Facebook Like the Baldwin Borough Public Library and you can email Pam at richterp@einetwork.net

The start of the school year sometimes can be a little difficult for kids to get back into the swing of things.

But the library has some great early-learning e-resources available for free that you can access anywhere with just your library card.

These can also be helpful if you want your child to get a head start heading into their first year of prekindergarten or kindergarten.

Here are three e-resources available for children offered free through the library:

• Little Pim: Little Pim is a language-learning resource that is part of Mango Languages.

Mango languages is a great resource for older children and adults who want to learn a new language or refresh their language-learning skills.

Little Pim is based on videos with the Little Pim panda as the main character in these videos.

There also are options for flash cards that have basic vocabulary.

This is a great resource for younger children to introduce them to basic language-learning skills. Ten languages are offered through Little Pim, including Spanish and German. You can access this by going to the “Language Learning” page on your local library's database page.

• Book Flix: This resource pairs video storybooks with related nonfiction books on similar subjects. There will be a picture book with slightly animated illustrations that you can watch with your child paired with a related nonfiction book. For example, one of the pairings is “Duck on a Bike” by David Shannon and a book about bicycle safety.

This resource is geared for younger children. These pairings are a great way to link fact and fiction and reinforce early reading skills. This can be found on the “Children's Resources” page of your local library's website.

• OverDrive for Kids Page: Hopefully, you are familiar with the library's primary e-book lending site: OverDrive. You can borrow e-books and audiobooks for free to your device. It also allows you to browse easier by reading levels or subjects.

Some subjects include picture books, sports and hobbies, and mystery, just to name a few.

Pam Calfo is the technology and marketing Librarian at the Baldwin Borough Public Library. Follow the library on Twitter @BBPL; on Facebook, Like the Baldwin Borough Public Library; and you can email Pam at calfop@einetwork.net.

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