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Christian artist from Verona leaves life of drugs for music

Submitted - Saved By the Blood musicians include Glenn Davis, seated, and standing, from left, Thamen Brown, Michael Williams and James Brown. Submitted
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em>Submitted</em></div>Saved By the Blood musicians include Glenn Davis, seated, and standing, from left,  Thamen Brown, Michael Williams and James Brown. Submitted
- Christian musician Glenn Davis submitted
Christian musician Glenn Davis submitted
submitted - Christian musician Glenn Davis's album The Book of Life submitted
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em>submitted</em></div>Christian musician Glenn Davis's album The Book of Life submitted

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By Julie Martin
Sunday, March 3, 2013, 9:00 p.m.
 

Glenn Davis and his Christian band Saved by the Blood plan to go where they are led, whether to nursing homes, community events or even prisons.

“I just figured when God opens a door to spreading his Gospel, you're supposed to go,” Davis says.

Davis, 57, says he hopes to spread his music and message throughout the region, including the Alle-Kiski Valley.

He and his band recently began rehearsing again, after the Verona resident underwent a liver transplant in July.

The surgery came in the nick of time, Although Davis and his doctors were initially unaware of that urgent need. After battling liver cancer with chemotherapy, Davis was placed on a waiting list for a new liver.

“They gave me the second chemo treatment,” he says, “but little did I know, two weeks later, they found out they had a liver.”

He had only been on the transplant list for two months.

After surgery was under way, doctors found that Davis' liver was not functioning. He had received the transplant just in time.

Now, he is finding the strength to continue with his band, gaining strength, walking his new dog, Soldier, and waking in the wee hours of the morning to pen new songs for his band.

Its original works feature what Roy Bingham, the band's minister and manager, calls a style reminiscent of country, R&B and island music.

A new CD, “Book of Life,” is available from Tate Music Group. (Davis' music can be found at www.tatemusicgroup.com.)

This isn't the first time Davis has overcome the odds.

He battled a drug addiction for more than 30 years, quitting, relapsing after 15, then overcoming addiction again. In addition to a higher power, he credits his wife, Andrea, with helping him to succeed.

“Another thing that makes it really possible for me to do what I do and for me to be able to have even got started, is to have a wife that loves me and believes in me,” he says.

“If it wasn't for my wife, I wouldn't have stopped using drugs.”

The inspiration to spread a message of hope and faith has directed his life since then.

“It's really something to be able to go back to a person I was shooting dope with, drinking liquor with, and say, ‘hey, there's a better way,'” he says.

“You'd be surprised the amount of people out there that are doing things they don't want to be doing. They're caught up; they want to find a way out. They just don't know how.”

Having gone through hell and back informs his relatable and passionate message; it's music inspired by his time living in Hawaii, where he learned to play guitar.

“We just call it God's music,” he says, adding it deals with “everything that's happening today.”

“It's gospel, but it's not traditional gospel. It's more or less a contemporary gospel. It deals with the truth.”

Bingham, who got Davis and Saved by the Blood involved with prison ministry, describes the music and its message as humble.

“It's geared toward the problems we're actually dealing with,” he says. “We're always willing to help people who need help.”

For Davis, spending time with his family, including his wife and young daughter, Narieah, and making music are part of another comeback, which he credits to a higher power.

“God got something for me to do; that's why I say, as long as I got a breath in me, I won't stop singing for the Lord,” he says.

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