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Filbern Manor celebrates eldest residents

| Wednesday, Feb. 13, 2013, 9:03 p.m.
Gathering for a few minutes after the Feb. 7, 2013, party honoring their 90-plus years of life are Filbern Manor residents (front) Mildred Calderone, (seated, from left) Norman Mains, Anthony Nicolette, Mary Duda (the oldest resident at 94), Ethel LOreski, Ruth Dinardo, Emma Collins, (standing) Ethyle Blair, Irene Lucovitz (a 32-year resident), Mary Hassick and Donna Kruper. Unable to attend the party are Cleo George and Helen Bergman. William S. Zirkle | The Times-Sun

Filbern Manor Tenant Council held a birthday party for its 13 eldest residents and their guests Feb. 7.

The festive event lauding the tenants, who were all over 90 years old, featured dignitaries, speeches, sandwiches, cake and ice cream in the community room which was decorated for the occasion.

The nonagenarians were honored with small gifts, flowers and many birthday cards, some of which were made by the Girl Scouts of Troops 60002 and 60023.

Poems were read and short bits about each celebrant were shared that entertained as well as informed the large group of well-wishers.

West Newton Mayor Mary Popovich presented them with a proclamation and honored them for their good deeds, good living and contributions to friends at Filbern Manor.

Congressman Tim Murphy congratulated the honorees for all that they have lived through—wars, depressions and raising families. He presented them with a certificate of Special Congressional Recognition.

Representing Interstate Realty management was Robin Madison, Pittsburgh district manager, Debbie Kiselich, assistant to district manager, and Linda Detman, site manager, who presented each honoree with a corsage and a red rose.

The officers of the tenant council also presented each with a yellow rose representing joy, gladness, delight and friendship.

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