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Piano from former Sutersville Elementary School may be sold

| Wednesday, June 19, 2013, 9:01 p.m.

The brown Kimball upright piano that Sutersville Borough inherited when it acquired the former Sutersville Elementary School from the Yough School District, could be up for sale, but not before the borough council learns whether senior citizens meeting at the community center want to use it.

Sutersville Council President William Ringbloom said last week that David Vines had inquired about buying the piano, which sits in the hallway outside the borough council chambers in the former elementary school.

There was no discussion of any offer that Vines might make for the piano and Vines could not be reached for comment.

Sutersville Mayor Alaina Breakiron said she would ask Sutersville Senior Citizens, a group that meets in the borough building, whether it is interested in having the piano.

Just how much the Kimball piano is worth is a mystery to Sutersville council members. Solicitor Wayne McGrew said that one of the senior citizens may know its value.

A small plaque on the piano states it is the property of the Sutersville PTO and is to be used in the Sutersville Elementary School. Dates marked on the inside, possibly references to tune-ups, range from November 1976 to January 1988.

The W.W. Kimball Piano Co. of Chicago was perhaps the most famous of all piano manufacturers, according to the website for the Antique Piano Shop of Friendsville, Tenn. The Kimball model piano has what Kimball refers to as its “exclusive mezzo-thermoneal stabilizer,” which the company stated was to ensure tonal stability.

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