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Fort Necessity offers kids fun lessons on young Washington

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By For The Daily Courier
Thursday, April 5, 2012
 

Fort Necessity National Battlefield, 1 Washington Parkway, Farmington, announced a new program by the National Park Service.

Children can learn about the adventures of George Washington in a new interactive computer program called "Young George Washington's Adventures."

Did you know George Washington was famous when he was 22• In January1754, Washington had just returned from a long and dangerous mission to ask the French to leave the Ohio River Valley. He prepared a report for the governor that chronicled how he handled frigid weather, hostile Indians and difficult French soldiers. To his surprise, the report was published in newspapers, magazines and booklets throughout the American colonies and in London.

The story will join more than 50 other stories and games on the National Park Service's on-line Junior Ranger program called WebRangers. Children can earn rewards and earn a WebRangers patch by completing all required activities.

Published in novel style, the newest WebRangers activity lets youths see another side to Washington -- the young, strong adventurer.

Children become involved in the story through activities. Users help young Washington decide what he should bring with him on his journey and whom he should have to help him. They can also explore Washington's clothing and equipment.

"This is a very exciting story. Washington almost died twice during the trip. The graphic novel style really brings the story to life for children," said Jeff Reinbold, superintendent of the National Park Service in Western Pennsylvania.

Kids of all ages can forget about the "old" George Washington they see on dollar bills and quarters. They can learn about the "young" Washington by checking out this new activity at www.webrangers.us.

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