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Prospect watch: Montour's Devin Wilson

Devin Wilson has a dilemma most WPIAL athletes would envy, having received Division I scholarship offers in two sports. While Wilson is thrilled to have multiple options, he has a difficult choice ahead of him.

"I haven't decided yet," Wilson said. "When I'm in that sport, whether it's football or basketball, I put all my time in that sport. In the summer, I train for both. I haven't picked one, but after basketball season I hope to pick one and buckle down and try to become my best at it.

"I'll never stop playing either sport in high school, that's for sure."

North Carolina State has offered the Montour junior a chance to play wide receiver in football, where he had a WPIAL-leading 72 receptions for 901 yards and 12 touchdowns for the WPIAL Class AAA champions.

"It's going to come down to what they want in a receiver," Montour coach Lou Cerro said. "If they want somebody who runs good routes, catches everything across the middle and can out-jump anybody, he's your guy."

Akron, Duquesne and James Madison want Wilson as a point guard in basketball, where he led Montour to a WPIAL title and PIAA runner-up finish last year and to the PIAA runner-up spot this spring.

Wilson attended Penn State's junior day for football prospects, but is focusing his attention on the hardwood for now. He admits that he goes back and forth every season on which sport is his favorite.

"That does happen sometimes," Wilson said. "If I'm playing real good during basketball season, I'm like, 'Basketball is great.' Same thing during football season: If I have a good practice or a good game, I'll be like, 'I want to play football.' My mind does change. I'm hoping to buckle down, see the pros and cons, and pick the sport where I can be my best."

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