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Trib reporters, photographers win national awards

| Saturday, Oct. 27, 2012, 8:48 p.m.
Tribune-Review investigative reporter Lou Kilzer.

Tribune-Review journalists received five citations in the national Inland Press Association contest and won the Truth in Finances award from the Pennsylvania Institute of Certified Public Accountants.

Investigative reporter Lou Kilzer's series of articles about Chinese firms that play fast and loose with U.S. stock market regulations won the Truth in Finances award from the CPA group. The organization said his report “exemplifies our shared commitment to protect the public interest.”

The annual award honors reporting that clarifies financial issues, uncovers financial fraud or exposes fraudulent activities that harm the financial well-being of people, communities or companies. The award will be presented Nov. 9 in Scranton during the Pennsylvania Newspaper Association's annual Newspaper of the Year brunch.

Kilzer's China package placed second in the investigative reporting competition among large newspapers in the Inland contest.

The Trib's web site, www.triblive.com, won second place for general excellence in Inland's Digital Journalism competition for papers with a print circulation of 20,000 or more.

Trib photographers were cited in three categories of Inland's photo competition.

Andrew Russell tied for second in the portrait category for an image of protesters outside a Republican presidential candidate debate in Manchester, N.H. The other second-place winner was Michael Smith of the Wyoming Tribune-Eagle in Cheyenne.

Justin Merriman and Stephanie Strasburg won third place in picture story for “Life in Cuba,” a package of images from Pope Benedict XVI's trip to the island nation.

Christopher Horner received an honorable mention in sports photography for a photo showing Steelers tight end Heath Miller catching a pass with the ball appearing to be balanced on the helmet of Houston Texans linebacker Brian Cushing.

The 127-year-old Inland Press Association represents almost 1,200 newspapers that reach nearly 20 million U.S. homes. Those awards will be presented Oct. 30 in Chicago.

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