TribLIVE

| News


 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Change in East Vandergrift sewer project studied

About The Tribune-Review
The Tribune-Review can be reached via e-mail or at 412-321-6460.
Contact Us | Video | Photo Reprints

Daily Photo Galleries


By George Guido

Published: Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012, 12:51 a.m.

A new regulation might complicate East Vandergrift's stormwater-sewage separation project.

Craig Bauer of KLH Engineering told council members on Monday night that the Westmoreland County Conservation District has mandated the project have a 20 percent reduction in stormwater runoff before the project even starts.

That means the eventual project engineer will have to build about 1,500 to 1,800 feet of sidewalk with permeable concrete.

That could add about $100,000 cost to the anticipated price tag of $3.2 million.

Bauer said he will meet with conservation district officials to see if anything can be done about the requirement.

The project is awaiting the green light from the state Department of Environmental Protection, which is reviewing the design plan.

Peoples Natural Gas is reviewing a plan to relocate lines along McKinley Avenue. The lines must be moved to allow the sewer-separation project to proceed along that street.

East Vandergrift is one of a number of Alle-Kiski Valley municipalities under a federal decree to separate stormwater and sewage lines.

Kiski Valley walking trail

Laura Hawkins of the Mainline Canal Greenway project spoke with council about the conclusion of a study on East Vandergrift's part in a plan to build a walking and bike trail from Pittsburgh to Harrisburg.

The Kiski Valley portion of the trail would connect communities similar to the Roaring Run Trail between Apollo and Saltsburg.

It would connect East Vandergrift with Vandergrift. Organizers are considering a switchback trail along the hillside between the two boroughs.

Kiosks would be established at various points of the trail recommending restaurants, lodging, services and historical information about the communities.

Grants and foundations will be contacted to build the trail and no taxpayer money from East Vandergrift residents is needed, according to Hawkins.

The drive for grant money might take as long as two or three years.

George Guido is a freelance writer for Trib Total Media.

 

 
 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read News

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.