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Pitt researchers to study brain injuries in military

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Friday, Nov. 9, 2012, 5:52 p.m.
 

Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine will use $5.4 million in government grants to study how effective a new imaging tool is at diagnosing traumatic brain injuries in wounded military personnel, according to UPMC.

The Department of Defense gave UPMC two grants to study high-definition fiber tracking, or HDFT.

Conventional CT and MRI scans often are unable to reveal damage to the brain's network of neural cables that could cause cognitive or physical impairments after traumatic brain injuries, said Dr. David Okonkwo, principal investigator and clinical director of the Brain Trauma Research Center in Oakland, in a statement.

Researchers hope to show that HDFT can identify fiber damage and link it with post-concussion syndrome, post-traumatic stress disorder and other neurologic symptoms.

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