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Pittsburgh's new police chief relishes his second 'proudest day'

| Thursday, Feb. 16, 2017, 6:15 p.m.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Newly sworn-in Pittsburgh Chief of Police, Scott Schubert greets Special Olympic Athlete, Danielle List, 16, of McKeesport and her father Jeff List after Schubert was sworn in at the City County Building, Thursday, Feb. 16, 2017. Schubert met List through his work with the Special Olympics.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Pittsburgh Chief of Police, Scott Schubert takes the oath of office at the City County Building, Thursday, Feb. 16, 2017. Schubert met List through his work with the Special Olympics.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Newly sworn-in Pittsburgh Chief of Police, Scott Schubert hugs Special Olympic Athlete, Mike Maker after Schubert was sworn in at the City County Building, Thursday, Feb. 16, 2017. Schubert met Maker through his work with the Special Olympics.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Pittsburgh Chief of Police, Scott Schubert shakes hands with fellow officers after taking the oath of office at the City County Building, Thursday, Feb. 16, 2017. Schubert met List through his work with the Special Olympics.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Newly sworn-in Pittsburgh Chief of Police, shakes hands with Pittsburgh Mayor Bill Peduto after Schubert took the oath of office at the City County Building, Thursday, Feb. 16, 2017.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Assistant Fire Chief, Norman Auvil stands at attention to say the pledge of allegiance before taking the oath of office at the City County Building, Thursday, Feb. 16, 2017.

Pittsburgh Mayor Bill Peduto administered the oath of office Thursday to newly appointed police Chief Scott Schubert and announced eight promotions in the police, fire and emergency medical services bureaus.

Schubert, 50, of Brookline said he loves Pittsburgh and the police bureau. He gave a sometimes emotional speech before several hundred people jammed inside and outside of the City Council Chamber in the City-County Building, Downtown. He thanked his officers for risking their lives daily for “complete strangers” and promised to help them in any way.

“The proudest day of my life was (his father, a former city police officer) pinning my badge on in 1993,” Schubert said. “This is my next proudest day.”

Schubert who has served various command roles during his 24-year career, including assistant and acting chief, will be paid $112,457 a year.

Peduto also announced the promotions of a deputy police chief and three assistants:

• Thomas Stangrecki is moving from assistant chief to deputy chief, the department's second highest position. He previously served as commander and assistant chief of administration, commander of major crimes and commander of narcotics. He is a 28-year veteran of the department. His salary is $103,936.

Assistant chiefs:

• Lavonnie Bickerstaff, major crimes commander. The 17-year veteran has served as commander of the Zone 1 station and in various roles as a sergeant.

• Anna Kudrav, commander of Zone 2 in the Hill District. She has 33 years with the department. She previously served as lieutenant in Zones 1 and 2 and in the former Research and Planning unit. Public Safety spokeswoman Sonya Toler said Schubert will decide on Kudrav's replacement in Zone 2 later.

• Linda Rosato-Barone, commander of narcotics and vice. The 37-year veteran will be assigned to assist the public safety director. She has served as a commander in Zones 5 and 2, watch commander and as chief of staff.

Assistant chiefs are paid $99,999 a year.

Eric Holmes, a former commander assigned to serve as chief of staff, was named executive officer, which carries the same duties as chief of staff. His salary is $97,374.

Norman Auvil, who has 37 years' experience in public safety roles with Pittsburgh, the state and Allegheny County, was named assistant fire chief at a salary of $99,368. He has served as division chief for the county's Emergency Management Services, bureau director for the Pennsylvania Emergency Management Agency and district chief, crew chief and paramedic for Pittsburgh EMS.

Amera Gilchrist, who served as district EMS chief, was promoted to assistant chief at a salary of $94,433; and Mark Larkin, an EMS crew chief, was promoted to district chief. His salary is $80,998.

Bob Bauder is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach him at 412-765-2312 or bbauder@tribweb.com.

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