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The Sandusky sentence: No closure

| Tuesday, Oct. 9, 2012, 2:10 p.m.

“YECH!” was our initial reaction to word that serial child molester Jerry Sandusky would be issuing a statement professing not contrition but his innocence in advance of Tuesday's sentencing on 45 counts of sex abuse.

Then we actually heard his words, recorded for and aired by Penn State's student-run online radio station. And it was all we could do to not retch. For those words only reinforce how dangerous and manipulative the former Penn State assistant football coach really is and how absolutely just is the effective life sentence he received.

Mr. Sandusky, 68, was sentenced to 30 to 60 years in prison. One of the offenses involved the rape of a young boy in a Penn State shower, witnessed by a graduate assistant. All told, 10 boys were molested over 15 years.

But in his statement, Sandusky blamed his victims and even their families. He intimated what would have had to have been a fantastical conspiracy. And he complained of a rush to trial and an unfair trial. Consider his statement for what it was — laying the groundwork for an appeal.

That is Sandusky's right, of course. But given the massive evidence presented, it's difficult to imagine any judge ever granting a new trial.

Sandusky's sentencing, however, does not end this sordid affair. There remain plenty of questions about who at Penn State knew what and when; two former high-ranking officials still must stand trial.

And, most tragically, Jerry Sandusky's victims will live in their own sad hell for the rest of their lives.

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