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Carlow University president to retire at end of July

| Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2013, 4:40 p.m.

The first president of Carlow University not to have been a nun plans to retire later this year, she announced.

Mary Hines, who has led Carlow since 2005, said in her State of the University Address Tuesday that she would retire at the end of her contract July 31.

“The university is well positioned to allow me to move on to a new phase in my life,” she said in a statement.

“My family asked me to promise to come home when my current contract expires, and I intend to honor that promise,” said Hines, who will move to the Baltimore area to be closer to her family. “The university is doing well enough for me to move on.”

Hines was the ninth president of the 2,346-student Oakland-based Catholic school, and the first not to have been drawn from the Sisters of Mercy, said spokesman Drew Wilson.

In the time Hines has been president, the university has doubled its graduate school enrollment and the number of full-time faculty members; sextupled the 2005 market value of the university's endowment and added several of the largest financial gifts in its history; and increased the university's visibility and reputation in the city.

A native of New York City, Hines earned her Master's degree and Doctorate in philosophy from The Catholic University of America Washington, D.C. Starting in 1973, she was a professor of philosophy at eight different schools in the Baltimore area and held several administrative positions at Dundalk and Catonsville, Md., community colleges before becoming Campus Executive Officer of Penn State's Wilkes-Barre campus in 1997.

Matthew Santoni is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. He can be reached at 412-380-5625 or msantoni@tribweb.com.

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