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Judge limits parties at Chukky Okobi's Shadyside mansion

| Thursday, Jan. 10, 2013, 6:00 p.m.

The ongoing legal battle between former Steelers center Chukky Okobi and his neighbors over the use of his Shadyside mansion bed-and-breakfast continued this week when a judge limited the number of loud events he can hold there.

Common Pleas Judge Robert Colville ruled Wednesday that the Mansion at Maple Heights is limited to four outdoor events per year that use live or amplified music consistent with “dance,” “party,” “band” or “wedding reception”-style music or entertainment.

The judge did not restrict wedding ceremonies or other outdoor events that use non-amplified, or very nominally amplified, musical or vocal accompaniment.

Damon Thomas, one of Okobi's attorneys, said the neighbors were seeking to shut down the Mansion, but the judge restricted only “some” outdoor music.

“We don't believe (the order) will interfere with the operation of the business,” Thomas said.

He declined to say whether Okobi would appeal.

Jordan Strassburger, an attorney for the neighbors, said his clients never sought to close the business.

“They complained about the music that was the product of the yearly 25 to 30 outdoor wedding receptions that significantly disrupted their ability to enjoy their own properties,” Strassburger said.

The bed-and-breakfast hosts weddings, corporate retreats and other social gatherings of up to 150 people, according to its website.

His neighbors sued in July 2011, claiming the parties blared loud music with lighting that continued late into the night.

Bobby Kerlik is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. He can be reached at 412-320-7886 or bkerlik@tribweb.com.

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