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NCAA to hold Penn State fine money until lawsuit is settled

| Thursday, Jan. 17, 2013, 5:06 p.m.

A Centre County lawmaker on Thursday said the NCAA has agreed not to spend any of the $12 million Penn State has paid in fines related to the Sandusky child sex scandal pending the resolution of a lawsuit he filed against the agency.

State Sen. Jake Corman, a Republican and Penn State alumnus, has been adamant that the fine money — $60 million to be paid in $12 million-a-year installments for five years — remain in Pennsylvania for distribution to child abuse prevention agencies here rather than to those across the country, as the NCAA proposed.

Corman filed a motion Jan. 7 seeking a preliminary injunction to prohibit the NCAA from releasing any of the money and later filed suit asking the court to bar the NCAA from releasing it.

NCAA officials did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

In papers filed in Commonwealth Court on Tuesday, attorneys for the NCAA said the agency had no intention to “disburse or dissipate funds in the immediate future” and agreed to give Corman written notice 60 days in advance of any intended disbursement.

“I believe keeping the money in Pennsylvania is not only appropriate, but also will significantly help the state achieve the goals and preparedness the Pennsylvania Task Force on Child Protection spells out,” Corman said.

Gov. Tom Corbett has filed suit seeking to overturn the NCAA's sanctions against the university.

Debra Erdley is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. She can be reached at 412-320-7996 or derdley@tribweb.com.

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