TribLIVE

| News

 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

City to join lawsuit challenging rejection of appraisals during reassessment

Email Newsletters

Click here to sign up for one of our email newsletters.

Daily Photo Galleries

'American Coyotes' Series

Traveling by Jeep, boat and foot, Tribune-Review investigative reporter Carl Prine and photojournalist Justin Merriman covered nearly 2,000 miles over two months along the border with Mexico to report on coyotes — the human traffickers who bring illegal immigrants into the United States. Most are Americans working for money and/or drugs. This series reports how their operations have a major impact on life for residents and the environment along the border — and beyond.

Wednesday, Jan. 23, 2013, 1:52 p.m.
 

Pittsburgh Controller Michael Lamb said he will appear in court Wednesday to join a lawsuit as a plaintiff on behalf of city residents who had certified real estate appraisals rejected by assessment appeals officers.

Various residents across Allegheny County on Jan. 7 sued the county and the Board of Property Assessment Appeals and Review, claiming that hearing officers improperly ignored solid evidence from homeowners appealing the property reassessments that the county performed last year. Specifically, the lawsuit alleges that certified appraisals that homeowners presented as evidence were not properly considered and that homeowners got no explanation why such evidence is not accepted.

“It is our sense that the board has arbitrarily rejected certified appraisals,” Lamb said in a prepared statement. “Unlike the property assessment process itself, the appraisals were completed by on the ground appraisers who did thorough appraisals of the properties.”

An attorney for the plaintiffs has said he wants the county to go back through its appeals and correct the cases in which he says the outcome is flawed because the appraisals weren‘t considered.

In February, the controller's office established a program offering free assessment appeal services to Pittsburgh homeowners whose property value is $150,000 or less. The program also offered discount property appraisal services.

City residents with a certified appraisal who feel that it was arbitrarily rejected by the review board can contact the controller's office for a review of their case, Lamb said. Call 412- 255-2054.

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.

 

 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Stories

  1. Zimbabwe alleges Murrysville doctor illegally killed lion
  2. Rossi: Looking at the next great Steeler
  3. Steelers swap draft pick for Eagles cornerback
  4. Ability to clog the trenches crucial to Steelers defense
  5. After early criticism, Haley has Steelers offense poised to be even better
  6. Penguins not alone in top-heavy approach to salary cap
  7. EPA diktats: Pushing back
  8. Shell shovels millions into proposed Beaver County plant site
  9. Pirates notebook: New acquisition Happ more than happy to fill spot in rotation
  10. Starting 9: Examining Pirates’ deadline decisions
  11. Steelers notebook: Injuries finally become issue at training camp