Share This Page

Former President George W. Bush to appear at Pittsburgh gas conference

| Monday, Jan. 28, 2013, 12:06 p.m.
In this Sept. 2, 2004, file photo, President George W. Bush speaks to the delegates at the Republican National Convention in New York. AP Photo

Former President George W. Bush will visit Pittsburgh this fall to speak at a gas industry conference, organizers said.

Bush's representatives could not be reached on Monday to confirm the planned appearance.

His luncheon speech would be a rare appearance from the country's 43rd president. He last drew news coverage in November for speaking to investors in the Cayman Islands, where organizers blocked journalists from attending.

His speech in Pittsburgh would take place during the DUG East energy conference for unconventional gas drillers, scheduled for Nov. 13-15 in Downtown, said Hart Energy, the conference organizers, in an email.

A Hart spokeswoman said she could not confirm nor deny Bush's visit.

Bush spent his early career starting and running oil exploration companies in Texas, according to news biographies. After about 12 years in the industry, his company failed and relatives and family friends bailed it out, according to a biography from the Canadian Broadcasting Corp.

This fall's DUG East will be the fifth that Hart has held in Pittsburgh. Many of those conferences featured big-name speakers and anti-drilling protests.

Former Bush adviser and GOP strategist Karl Rove spoke at the second conference in 2010. That drew protest from industry opponents outside, but Rove's speech to about 2,300 people received a standing ovation.

Timothy Puko is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. He can be reached at 412-320-7991 or tpuko@tribweb.com.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.