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More snow possible throughout Sunday in Western Pennsylvania

| Sunday, Feb. 3, 2013, 10:46 a.m.

The National Weather Service has lifted its winter weather advisory for Pittsburgh, although parts of West Virginia and Maryland and higher elevations in Westmoreland and Fayette Counties could still see more heavy snow.

A winter weather advisory originally expected to last through noon Sunday was instead lifted Saturday night, but Pittsburgh could still see an additional inch of snowfall throughout the day, said John Darnley, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Moon. About 3 inches accumulated at the weather service's office since Saturday, he said.

The ridges of Westmoreland and Fayette remained under a winter weather advisory until 7 p.m. Sunday, with another 1 to 3 inches of accumulation possible.

Few weather-related incidents or accidents were reported overnight Saturday, Allegheny County 911 dispatchers said. Duquesne Light officials said about 40 customers were without power in the North Hills Sunday morning, but police in Ross attributed that to a blown transformer and downed wires.

Pittsburgh Public Works Director Rob Kaczorowski said that by late morning road crews had finished plowing and salting most of the city's primary roads; were re-treating some of the secondary roads that got a fresh coat of snow in a morning squall; and were starting to treat the narrowest, least-used streets and alleys. Some neighborhoods, like Lincoln Place, got more snow than others and were slower than the rest to be cleared, he said.

About 8:15 a.m., the Pennsylvania Turnpike issued a weather advisory for about 200 miles of the toll road between the Ohio Gateway and the Blue Mountain interchange near the Franklin-Cumberland county line. Drivers were warned to keep alert for changing travel conditions and emergency road crews.

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