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13 Western Pennsylvania projects win millions in state grants

| Monday, Feb. 11, 2013, 4:30 p.m.

Gov. Tom Corbett said on Monday that 54 companies, government authorities and foundations will receive nearly $125 million from the state's Redevelopment Assistance Capital Program, including 13 entities in Allegheny, Butler, Washington and Westmoreland counties.

The state will give $2 million to Calgon Carbon Corp. to help it build a 65,000-square-foot employee training and manufacturing building in Findlay to accommodate growth in the firm's UV Technologies Division. The UV technology is used to disinfect drinking water, reuse water from sewage and treat ship ballast water.

A $3 million grant will go to the Butler County Community Development Corp. for The Summit at Cranberry Woods, a planned development of retail shops, hotels and office buildings on Route 228 in Cranberry. Plans feature a UPMC-backed sports training center and hockey practice rink the Penguins would use when Consol Energy Center is not available. The Penguins, UPMC and the township are negotiating terms.

In the city of Butler, $2 million will go toward a planned revitalization of downtown that includes adding parking, a hotel and a pharmacy.

In Westmoreland County, grants of $1 million each will go to the Latrobe Parking Authority, which intends to renovate its garages on Spring and Weldon streets; and the Westmoreland County Airpark, where the county Industrial Development Corp. is planning a 52-acre office park expansion to attract energy-related and advanced manufacturing businesses next to Arnold Palmer Regional Airport.

The Western Pennsylvania Operating Engineers will receive $500,000 to build a training facility on its site in Salem.

The Tribune-Review reported on Friday that six development projects would receive a combined $16.75 million in Pittsburgh, with the largest amount ($5 million) going to the city-county Sports & Exhibition Authority. The authority plans to use the money to install utility lines and build roads on 28 acres in the Lower Hill District that once was home to the Civic Arena.

The other Pittsburgh-based recipients are: Walnut Capital's Bakery Square 2.0 project in East Liberty ($4 million); Millcraft Industries' The Gardens at Market Square ($4 million); an expansion of the Heinz History Center's archival space in the Strip District ($2 million); Elmhurst Co.'s seven-story Schenley Place office building in Oakland ($1 million); and a renovation of the Steamfitters Technology Training Center in Duquesne Heights ($750,000).

In Washington County, the state will give $1.5 million to defray construction and development costs associated with the first phase of the Starpointe Business Park in Hanover.

Jeremy Boren is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. He can be reached at 412-320-7935 or jboren@tribweb.com.

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