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Attorney: Special prosecutor investigation 'has nothing to do' with former PSU counsel Baldwin

| Thursday, Feb. 28, 2013, 10:33 a.m.

The appointment of a special prosecutor to investigate possible breaches of secrecy in the grand jury that investigated Jerry Sandusky has nothing to do with Penn State University's former general counsel Cynthia Baldwin, her lawyer said.

Senior Judge Barry Feudale, who directed the statewide grand jury in Harrisburg that handled the Sandusky investigation, appointed former state Deputy Attorney General James Reeder to investigate allegations that the secrecy of the statewide panel, and that of a Dauphin County grand jury that investigated a casino owner, might have been breached.

“The February 8, 2013 order issued by Judge Feudale has nothing to do with Cynthia Baldwin,” lawyer Charles DeMonaco said in an email.

Feudale's order came as he weighed requests from three Penn State administrators charged with concealing allegations against Sandusky, the former Penn State assistant coach serving 30 to 60 years in prison for his conviction for abusing 10 boys in and around university facilities.

Former Penn State President Graham Spanier, retired Vice President Gary Schultz and former Athletic Director Tim Curley are asking Feudale to bar Baldwin from testifying against them at a preliminary hearing and to throw out her grand jury testimony, claiming she acted improperly when she sat in on their grand jury testimony without representing them.

DeMonaco maintains that Baldwin, a former state Supreme Court justice, acted properly.

Prosecutors, attorneys and court officials are prohibited from discussing grand jury matters under Pennsylvania law and can face sanctions for breaches of secrecy. Witnesses can disclose their own testimony. Feudale's order empowers the special prosecutor to investigate whether anyone barred from discussing proceedings breached confidentiality.

Debra Erdley is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. She can be reached at 412-320-7996 or derdley@tribweb.com

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