Share This Page

Former Pittsburgh police chief's company to dissolve

| Monday, March 11, 2013, 6:18 p.m.

An attorney representing Pittsburgh police Cmdr. Eric Holmes said on Monday that a company his client formed with former Chief Nate Harper and three others will dissolve this year.

Attorney Patrick Thomassey said Diversified Public Safety Consultants did three jobs in 2012, taking in a total of about $5,600.

“None of it involved public time. It was all on their own time,” Thomassey said. “As soon as the taxes are paid for 2012, it will be dissolved.”

Allegheny County District Attorney Stephen A. Zappala Jr. last month sent a cease-and-desist letter to company owners Holmes, Harper, Sgt. Barry Budd, Officer Tonya Montgomery-Ford and civilian police clerk Tamara Davis.

Thomassey said the jobs were security-related, including consulting for the 2012 Super Bowl in Indianapolis.

“They decided to set it up because they were getting inquiries after the G-20. Part of the fallout was that Pittsburgh did such a good job with the G-20 security that they were getting calls,” Thomassey said.

Pittsburgh hosted the Group of 20 economic summit with world leaders in 2009.

Thomassey didn't know who proposed establishing a company or why those five became involved.

He said Holmes took a second job as public safety director at Slippery Rock University with approval from the city Law Department. Holmes was interim director of public safety from 2007-08 at Slippery Rock. City Solicitor Dan Regan did not return a call for comment.

Thomassey said Holmes provided him an email exchange with the law department showing the office knew about the job. He did not release the email.

“Eric is a single guy. He loves his work. He's never double-dipped,” Thomassey said.

He said Holmes knew nothing about several accounts at the Greater Pittsburgh Police Federal Credit Union, which the FBI is investigating. Authorities are trying to determine whether someone diverted public money into the accounts.

Investigators with the District Attorney's Office separately are reviewing whether companies involving four other Pittsburgh officers should have private detective licenses, spokesman Mike Manko said.

Kincaid Security LLC is connected to Sgt. Charles Henderson; homicide detective Scott Evans owns Evans Polygraph Services Inc.; Officer Martin Link owns L&N Security Services; and Sgt. Dan Connolly owns Pittsburgh Collision and Reconstructive Services.

— Bobby Kerlik is a Trib Total Media staff writer. Reach him at 412-320-7886 or bkerlik@tribweb.com.

Related Content
TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.