TribLIVE

| News


 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Argentine Cardinal Jorge Bergoglio elected as newest pope

Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review - Argentinians wave their country's flag after the archbishop of Buenos Aires, Jorge Mario Bergoglio, was elected as the new spiritual leader of the world's 1.2 billion Catholics on Wednesday, March 13, 2013 at the Vatican. Bergoglio took the papal name of Francis I and has become the 266 pontiff in the Church's 2,000-year history and the first non-European to be elected for almost 1,300 years.
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em>Justin Merriman  |  Tribune-Review</em></div>Argentinians wave their country's flag after the archbishop of Buenos Aires, Jorge Mario Bergoglio, was elected as the new spiritual leader of the world's 1.2 billion Catholics on Wednesday, March 13, 2013 at the Vatican.  Bergoglio took the papal name of Francis I and has become the 266 pontiff in the Church's 2,000-year history and the first non-European to be elected for almost 1,300 years.
Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review - Pope Francis delivers his first blessing to a huge crowd in St Peter’s Square on Wednesday night, March 13, 2013, asking for the prayers of “all men and women of good will” to help him lead the church.
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em>Justin Merriman  |  Tribune-Review</em></div>Pope Francis delivers his first blessing to a huge crowd in St Peter’s Square on Wednesday night, March 13, 2013, asking for the prayers of “all men and women of good will” to help him lead the church.
AP - Pope Francis waves to the crowd from the central balcony of St. Peter's Basilica at the Vatican, Wednesday, March 13, 2013. Cardinal Jorge Bergoglio who chose the name of Francis, is the 266th pontiff of the Roman Catholic Church.
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em>AP</em></div>Pope Francis waves to the crowd from the central balcony of St. Peter's Basilica at the Vatican, Wednesday, March 13, 2013. Cardinal Jorge Bergoglio who chose the name of  Francis, is the 266th pontiff of the Roman Catholic Church.
Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review - With the College of Cardinals filling the balconies of St. Peter's Basilica, Pope Francis I addresses the crowd at St. Peter's Square after becoming the 266th pontiff in the Catholic church's 2,000 year history.
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em>Justin Merriman  |  Tribune-Review</em></div>With the College of Cardinals filling the balconies of St. Peter's Basilica, Pope Francis I addresses the crowd at St. Peter's Square after becoming the 266th pontiff in the Catholic church's 2,000 year history.
Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review - White smoke billows from the chimney atop the Sistine Chapel signaling that the College of Cardinals have elected a new pope on Wednesday evening, March 13, 2013, at the Vatican.
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em>Justin Merriman  |  Tribune-Review</em></div>White smoke billows from the chimney atop the Sistine Chapel signaling that the College of Cardinals have elected a new pope on Wednesday evening, March 13, 2013, at the Vatican.
Getty Images - Newly elected Pope Francis I appears on the central balcony of St Peter's Basilica on March 12, 2013 in Vatican City, Vatican. Argentinian Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio was elected as the 266th Pontiff and will lead the world's 1.2 billion Catholics.
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em>Getty Images</em></div>Newly elected Pope Francis I appears on the central balcony of St Peter's Basilica on March 12, 2013 in Vatican City, Vatican.  Argentinian Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio was elected as the 266th Pontiff and will lead the world's 1.2 billion Catholics.
Getty Images - Newly elected Pope Francis I waves to the waiting crowd from the central balcony of St Peter's Basilica on March 13, 2013 in Vatican City, Vatican. Argentinian Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio was elected as the 266th Pontiff and will lead the world's 1.2 billion Catholics.
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em>Getty Images</em></div>Newly elected Pope Francis I waves to the waiting crowd from the central balcony of St Peter's Basilica on March 13, 2013 in Vatican City, Vatican. Argentinian Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio was elected as the 266th Pontiff and will lead the world's 1.2 billion Catholics.
REUTERS - Newly elected Pope Francis, Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio of Argentina appears on the balcony of St. Peter's Basilica after being elected by the conclave of cardinals, at the Vatican, March 13, 2013. White smoke rose from the Sistine Chapel chimney and the bells of St. Peter's Basilica rang out on Wednesday, signaling that Roman Catholic cardinals had elected a pope to succeed Benedict XVI.
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em>REUTERS</em></div>Newly elected Pope Francis, Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio of Argentina appears on the balcony of St. Peter's Basilica after being elected by the conclave of cardinals, at the Vatican, March 13, 2013. White smoke rose from the Sistine Chapel chimney and the bells of St. Peter's Basilica rang out on Wednesday, signaling that Roman Catholic cardinals had elected a pope to succeed Benedict XVI.
Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review - With the College of Cardinals filling the balconies of St. Peter's Basilica, Pope Francis I addresses the crowd at St. Peter's Square after becoming the 266th pontiff in the Catholic church's 2,000 year history.
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em>Justin Merriman  |  Tribune-Review</em></div>With the College of Cardinals filling the balconies of St. Peter's Basilica, Pope Francis I addresses the crowd at St. Peter's Square after becoming the 266th pontiff in the Catholic church's 2,000 year history.
Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review - People react after white smoke billows from the chimney atop the Sistine Chapel and its bells ring out across the square, signaling that the College of Cardinals have elected a new pope on Wednesday evening, March 13, 2013 at the Vatican.
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em>Justin Merriman  |  Tribune-Review</em></div>People react after white smoke billows from the chimney atop the Sistine Chapel and its bells ring out across the square, signaling that the College of Cardinals have elected a new pope on Wednesday evening, March 13, 2013 at the Vatican.
Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review - People react after white smoke billows from the chimney atop the Sistine Chapel and its bells ring out across the square, signaling that the College of Cardinals have elected a new pope on Wednesday evening, March 13, 2013 at the Vatican.
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em>Justin Merriman  |  Tribune-Review</em></div>People react after white smoke billows from the chimney atop the Sistine Chapel and its bells ring out across the square, signaling that the College of Cardinals have elected a new pope on Wednesday evening, March 13, 2013 at the Vatican.
Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review - People react after white smoke billows from the chimney atop the Sistine Chapel and its bells ring out across the square, signaling that the College of Cardinals have elected a new pope on Wednesday evening, March 13, 2013 at the Vatican.
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em>Justin Merriman  |  Tribune-Review</em></div>People react after white smoke billows from the chimney atop the Sistine Chapel and its bells ring out across the square, signaling that the College of Cardinals have elected a new pope on Wednesday evening, March 13, 2013 at the Vatican.
Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review - People react after white smoke billows from the chimney atop the Sistine Chapel and its bells ring out across the square, signaling that the College of Cardinals have elected a new pope on Wednesday evening, March 13, 2013 at the Vatican.
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em>Justin Merriman  |  Tribune-Review</em></div>People react after white smoke billows from the chimney atop the Sistine Chapel and its bells ring out across the square, signaling that the College of Cardinals have elected a new pope on Wednesday evening, March 13, 2013 at the Vatican.
Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review - A couple holds each other as they wait in St. Peter's Square on Wednesday, March 13, 2013, as thousands watch the small chimney atop the Sistine Chapel in the Vatican awaiting smoke to signal if the College of Cardinals have elected a new pope.
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em>Justin Merriman  |  Tribune-Review</em></div>A couple holds each other as they wait in St. Peter's Square on Wednesday, March 13, 2013, as thousands watch the small chimney atop the Sistine Chapel in the Vatican awaiting smoke to signal if the College of Cardinals have elected a new pope.
Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review - Nuns wait in St. Peter's Square on Wednesday, March 13, 3013, as thousands watch the small chimney atop the Sistine Chapel in the Vatican on Wednesday morning awaiting smoke to signal if the College of Cardinals have elected a new pope.
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em>Justin Merriman  |  Tribune-Review</em></div>Nuns wait in St. Peter's Square on Wednesday, March 13, 3013, as thousands watch the small chimney atop the Sistine Chapel in the Vatican on Wednesday morning awaiting smoke to signal if the College of Cardinals have elected a new pope.
Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review - Black smoke billows out of the chimney atop the Sistine Chapel in the Vatican on Wednesday, March 13,2013, as cardinals failed twice on Wednesday morning to elect a new pope. The 115 voting cardinals will return later in the day to resume voting. The new pope must receive a two-thirds majority, or 77 votes, to become the 266th pontiff.
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em>Justin Merriman  |  Tribune-Review</em></div>Black smoke billows out of the chimney atop the Sistine Chapel in the Vatican on Wednesday, March 13,2013, as cardinals failed twice on Wednesday morning  to elect a new pope. The 115 voting cardinals will return later in the day to resume voting. The new pope must receive a two-thirds majority, or 77 votes, to become the 266th pontiff.
Related Stories

Daily Photo Galleries

By The Associated Press
Wednesday, March 13, 2013, 6:48 a.m.
 

VATICAN CITY — Jorge Bergoglio of Argentina was elected pope Wednesday and chose the name Francis, becoming the first pontiff from the Americas and the first from outside Europe in more than a millennium.

Looking stunned, Francis shyly waved to the crowd of tens of thousands of people who gathered in St. Peter's Square, marveling that the cardinals needed to look to "the end of the earth" to find a bishop of Rome.

In choosing a 76-year-old pope, the cardinals clearly decided that they didn't need a vigorous, young pope who would reign for decades but rather a seasoned, popular pastor who would draw followers to the faith. The cardinal electors overcame deep divisions to select the 266th pontiff in a remarkably fast, five-ballot conclave.

Francis asked for prayers for himself, and for retired Pope Benedict XVI, whose surprising resignation paved the way for the conclave that brought the first Jesuit to the papacy.

"Brothers and sisters, good evening," Francis said to wild cheers in his first public remarks as pontiff. "You know that the work of the conclave is to give a bishop to Rome. It seems as if my brother cardinals went to find him from the end of the earth. Thank you for the welcome."

Bergoglio had reportedly finished second in the 2005 conclave that produced Benedict - who last month became the first pope to resign in 600 years.

After announcing "Habemus Papam" — "We have a pope!" — a cardinal standing on the balcony of St. Peter's Basilica on Wednesday revealed the identity of the new pontiff, using his Latin name.

The longtime archbishop of Buenos Aires has spent nearly his entire career at home in Argentina, overseeing churches and shoe-leather priests.

Like other Jesuit intellectuals, Bergoglio has focused on social outreach. Catholics are still buzzing over his speech last year accusing fellow church officials of hypocrisy for forgetting that Jesus Christ bathed lepers and ate with prostitutes.

Bergoglio has slowed a bit with age and is feeling the effects of having a lung removed due to infection when he was a teenager.

In a lifetime of teaching and leading priests in Latin America, which has the largest share of the world's Catholics, Bergoglio has also shown a keen political sensibility as well as the kind of self-effacing humility that fellow cardinals value highly, according to his official biographer, Sergio Rubin.

He showed that humility on Wednesday, saying that before he blessed the crowd he wanted their prayers for him and bowed his head.

"Good night, and have a good rest," he said before going back into the palace.

Tens of thousands of people who braved cold rain to watch the smokestack atop the Sistine Chapel jumped in joy when white smoke poured out a few minutes past 7 p.m., many shouting "Habemus Papam!" or "We have a pope!" — as the bells of St. Peter's Basilica and churches across Rome pealed.

They cheered again when the doors to the loggia opened, and again when Bergoglio's name was announced.

"I can't explain how happy I am right now," said Ben Canete, a 32-year-old Filipino, jumping up and down in excitement.

Elected on the fifth ballot, Francis was chosen in one of the fastest conclaves in years, remarkable given there was no clear front-runner going into the vote and that the church had been in turmoil following the upheaval unleashed by Pope Benedict XVI's surprise resignation.

A winner must receive 77 votes, or two-thirds of the 115, to be named pope.

For comparison's sake, Benedict was elected on the fourth ballot in 2005 - but he was the clear front-runner going into the vote. Pope John Paul II was elected on the eighth ballot in 1978 to become the first non-Italian pope in 455 years.

Patrizia Rizzo ran down the main boulevard to the piazza with her two children as soon as she heard the news on the car radio. "I parked the car ... and dashed to the square, she said. "It's so exciting, as Romans we had to come."

The Vatican spokesman the Rev. Federico Lombardi said it was a "good hypothesis" that the pope would be installed next Tuesday, on the feast of St. Joseph, patron saint of the universal church.

Unlike the confusion that reigned during the 2005 conclave, the smoke this time around has been clear: black during the first two rounds of burned ballots, and then a clear white on Wednesday night - thanks to special smoke flares akin to those used in soccer matches or protests that were lit in the chapel ovens.

The Vatican on Wednesday divulged the secret recipe used: potassium perchlorate, anthracene, which is a derivative of coal tar, and sulfur for the black smoke; potassium chlorate, lactose and a pine resin for the white smoke.

The chemicals are contained in five units of a cartridge that is placed inside the stove of the Sistine Chapel. When activated, the five blocks ignite one after another for about a minute apiece, creating the steady stream of smoke that accompanies the natural smoke from the burned ballot papers.

Despite the great plumes of smoke that poured out of the chimney, neither the Sistine frescoes nor the cardinals inside the chapel suffered any smoke damage, Lombardi said.

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.

 

 
 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Stories

  1. Former Steelers LB Haggans to do time in Westmoreland jail
  2. Crosby banned from Jets game because he missed All-Star Game
  3. LeBeau won’t join Cardinals coaching staff
  4. Snow causes collisions, delays in Mon-Yough area
  5. Some normalcy returns to Homestead business district devastated by fire
  6. Liberty public servant Owens remembered as problem solver
  7. Pittsburgh cracks down on overcrowded houses
  8. Pine-Richland’s DiNucci to Pitt; Kittanning’s Bowers opts for PSU
  9. Teen found in Riverview Park last year died of overdose
  10. Munhall council president charged in crash that injured woman
  11. 1 suspect arrested in deadly McKeesport shooting; 2nd still at large