Share This Page

Montgomery commissioner decides against 2014 GOP gubernatorial run

| Tuesday, May 7, 2013, 5:45 p.m.

Republican Bruce Castor, a Montgomery County commissioner, has decided not to challenge Gov. Tom Corbett in 2014, he said on Tuesday in a Facebook post.

Castor wrote that he decided not to run after “a great deal of consideration.” He could not be reached.

“I want to thank all those who encouraged and advised me over the last six months,” he wrote online. “Simply put, my duties as Montgomery County commissioner, a lawyer with Elliott Greenleaf and the responsibilities to my family, make a massive undertaking such as running for governor impossible for me this election cycle.”

Castor told Tribune-Review editors and reporters last month that he wanted a rematch with Corbett, to whom he lost the 2004 primary race for state attorney general, but that it would be months before he decided whether Corbett is sufficiently vulnerable to merit a re-election challenge.

A Quinnipiac University poll in April found Corbett's disapproving rating at 38 percent and showed that three likely Democratic challengers — state Treasurer Rob McCord, U.S. Rep. Allyson Schwartz and former U.S. Rep. Joe Sestak — could beat the Shaler Republican by margins of 9, 13 and 14 percentage points, respectively.

Castor, 51, a former district attorney, is serving a second term as commissioner.

Salena Zito is a Trib Total Media staff writer. Reach her at szito@tribweb.com.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.