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New York mayoral candidate Weiner uses Pittsburgh as backdrop

| Thursday, May 23, 2013, 4:51 p.m.

Let's face it. It's not the most embarrassing thing he's ever done.

New York mayoral candidate Anthony Weiner, a former U.S. House member and tweeter of lewd selfies, inexplicably splashed a photograph of Pittsburgh's Downtown skyline across his campaign website.

His campaign did not respond to email and phone requests for comment.

“Is he even eligible to run in Pittsburgh?” wondered an amused Sonya Toler, campaign spokeswoman for Democratic mayoral nominee Bill Peduto. On the bright side, she said, “It speaks well for the viability of our city's future that it is able to attract interest on this level.”

Weiner resigned from Congress in 2011 after his admission that he sent sexually explicit photos of himself to several women through Twitter.

“Anthony Weiner obviously struggles with using social media,” Pittsburgh's Republican mayoral nominee, Josh Wander, said in an email. “If he decides to move here and to run for mayor of Pittsburgh, I will send him a tweet welcoming him to the city.”

Weiner, a Democrat, is attempting to become the second disgraced politician to make a comeback this year. This month, former South Carolina Gov. Mark Sanford, a Republican who attempted to cover a tryst with an Argentine mistress by telling people he was hiking the Appalachian Trail, won a seat in Congress.

By 4:30 p.m., Weiner's campaign had swapped out the blue-hued shot of Downtown — apparently taken from Roberto Clemente Bridge — with a blocky, two-tone rendering of what appeared to be the Empire State Building.

Mike Wereschagin is a Trib Total Media staff writer. Reach him at 412-320-7900 or mwereschagin@tribweb.com.

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