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Senior citizens warned about 'robocalls' for medical alert equipment

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Tuesday, June 4, 2013, 5:51 p.m.
 

The state Attorney General issued a warning on Tuesday to older Pennsylvanians about a recent spike in so-called “robocalls” designed to deceitfully obtain billing information to charge $35 a month for purported monitoring services that may be unnecessary.

The businesses sometimes identify themselves as “Senior Medical Alert” or “Senior Medical Advisors,” state Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane said. She said recorded messages tell pople they have been approved for medical alert equipment “at no charge.” When people respond, however, they are pressured into providing billing information, Kane said.

She said the robocalls use scare tactics to get seniors to respond quickly. Some seniors have received follow-up calls from telemarketers who are even more aggressive and harassing, Kane said.

Kane said there are many reputable companies who sell medical alert equipment and services and will provide information about and written contracts for them. She said consumers have three days under state law to cancel any contracts they enter into from home.

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