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Ice rink for public use possible at Cranberry sports medicine facility

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By Bill Vidonic
Monday, July 1, 2013, 9:15 p.m.
 

The Pittsburgh Penguins could open up one of two ice rinks at a proposed sports medicine facility to the public, operating a retail store and concessions there, according to developers of the Village of Cranberry Woods.

Developers on Monday presented detailed master development plans to Cranberry's planning advisory commission. The 57-acre site will feature a mix of retail shops, hotels and office buildings along Route 228, adjacent to the Westinghouse headquarters.

Roger Altmeyer, UPMC director of community project development, said UPMC will build the facility and have some medical facilities inside. The Penguins would lease most of the building, which will feature two ice rinks, one with no seating to be used as their practice facility. That would replace the Penguins' practice facility in Southpointe, Washington County.

The Penguins could open up the other rink, with 1,500 seats, for youth league play and other public events, Altmeyer said.

“Their (Penguins') business is hockey, and they want to promote it,” Altmeyer said. Developers also said the Penguins would have a separate entrance into the building, and about 50 of the 500 parking spaces would be reserved for the Penguins and surrounded by landscaping for privacy.

Altmeyer said land grading could start in the fall, and construction on the 175,000-square-foot building could begin in the spring, with a projected opening date in the summer of 2015.

The township planning advisory commission could make a recommendation on the master development plan as early as its Aug. 5 meeting. The master plan approval would then go on to township supervisors, a process that could take a few months. The township must approve individual phases of the development project, which encompass about 57 acres.

Bill Vidonic is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. He can be reached at 412-380-5621 or bvidonic@tribweb.com.

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