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Teresa Heinz Kerry hospitalized in critical condition in Nantucket

| Sunday, July 7, 2013, 6:21 p.m.
In this Sunday, Oct. 17, 2004 file photo, Teresa Heinz Kerry covers her heart after speaking at the United Jewish Communities 2004 International Lion of Judah Conference, in Washington.

Teresa Heinz Kerry, the wife of Secretary of State John Kerry, was in critical but stable condition Sunday at a Boston hospital with an undisclosed illness.

Nantucket Cottage Hospital spokesman Noah Brown said Heinz Kerry, 74, heir to the Heinz ketchup fortune in Pittsburgh, was admitted shortly after 3:30 p.m. to the emergency room of the resort island's only full-service medical provider.

She came to the facility in critical condition, and remains that way, although she has been stabilized, Brown said.

A statement from John Kerry's spokesman, Glen Johnson, said the secretary of State accompanied her to the hospital, and he went with her as she was transferred to Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston — the largest hospital in New England and the primary teaching hospital for Harvard University.

“The family is grateful for the outpouring of support it has received and aware of the interest in her condition, but they ask for privacy at this time,” Johnson said. The couple have been married since 1995.

Nantucket Police Lt. Jerry Adams said a call requesting medical aid was received just after 3:30 p.m. for a home on Hulbert Avenue, and an ambulance was dispatched. Online records show the property is connected to Heinz Kerry's family.

Heinz Kerry is the widow of former Sen. John Heinz and has an estate in Fox Chapel. She is the chair of The Heinz Endowments, Downtown, which was valued at $1.4 billion and awarded $67.1 million in grants in 2011, according to the most recent annual report posted online.

She was treated for breast cancer in 2009 and 2010, learning she had Stage 1 cancer in an annual mammogram and undergoing multiple lumpectomies. Her doctors said her cancer was treatable because it was caught at an early stage.

Her husband's presence in Nantucket after a 12-day trip to the Middle East was the source of some controversy last week. CBS News reported that Kerry was aboard the family's yacht and published a producer's photos of the secretary of State sailing the same day that Egypt's military ousted its president. After an initial denial, the State Department conceded Kerry was “briefly” aboard the yacht but was in constant contact with U.S. and Egyptian officials via phone.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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