Share This Page

Hundreds more Penn State student-athletes lend support to Paterno lawsuit

| Thursday, July 11, 2013, 2:00 p.m.

More than 500 former Penn State student-athletes have added their names to statements in support of a lawsuit the family of Joe Paterno filed to overturn NCAA sanctions against the school.

The initial complaint in Centre County Court listed the family of the late Penn State football coach, as well as several university trustees, faculty members, coaches and former football players as plaintiffs in the suit, which also seeks damages and legal costs. Shortly afterward, more than 300 former university athletes issued a statement in support of the suit.

The student-athletes who have signed letters of support for the lawsuits span seven decades of play and 17 sports, group spokesman Brian Allen said.

The NCAA imposed sweeping sanctions against Penn State last summer in the wake of the Jerry Sandusky child sex abuse scandal, including $60 million in fines, a multi-year ban on bowl play, a reduction of scholarships and the removal of more than 100 Penn State wins.

Critics said the NCAA acted in haste and violated its own guidelines when it punished Penn State days after the controversial Freeh Report was released. The university-commissioned report was critical of the actions by Paterno, who died of lung cancer in January 2012, in response to the Sandusky scandal.

New Penn State athlete-alumni adding their support to the Paterno family's lawsuit are 1973 Heisman Trophy winner John Cappelletti, All-Americans Ed O'Neil, Charlie Getty, D.J. Dozier, Ki-Jana Carter and Michael Mauti, two-time national champion and Olympic wrestler Kerry McCoy and national soccer Player of the Year Christine Welsh.

Michael Mauti, a criminal justice graduate wrote: “I signed on because I have faith in justice and due process. I spent the last year fighting for it in the media, and I'll continue to fight for it with the men who built the program we all love. We all want what's best for our program.”

Sandusky, a retired football coach who was convicted of abusing boys in and around the Penn State campus, is serving a 30-60 year prison term.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.