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Ex-Massey official gets 3½ years in prison for conspiracy

| Tuesday, Sept. 10, 2013, 4:06 p.m.

BECKLEY, W.Va. — A former Massey Energy executive who admitted he conspired in an illegal advance-warning scheme at West Virginia coal mines was ordered on Tuesday to spend 3½ years behind bars for his role in undermining both federal safety laws and the inspectors charged with enforcing them.

U.S. District Judge Irene Berger sentenced former White Buck Coal Co. President David Hughart on conspiracy charges that grew out of a criminal investigation into the 2010 Upper Big Branch mine disaster. She ordered him to serve three years' probation when he finishes his sentence. White Buck was a Massey subsidiary.

“I'm sorry for what I've done in the past. I let it happen,” Hughart told the judge. “It was very common practice.”

Though Hughart never worked at Upper Big Branch, he is cooperating in a Department of Justice probe of the explosion that killed 29 men. Two other men, former Upper Big Branch security chief Hughie Elbert Stover and former superintendent Gary May, are behind bars for their actions at the now-sealed mine near Montcoal.

Hughart's cooperation signals that federal prosecutors may be working their way up Massey's corporate ladder, though they have steadfastly refused to comment on their possible targets.

“He was part of a larger conspiracy, and that is of significant concern to us,” said U.S. Attorney Booth Goodwin. “This practice could not have occurred alone. And we're going to take this investigation wherever it leads, and we're going to make longstanding change in the safety of our coal mines.”

Hughart has admitted his role in ensuring that miners at other Massey subsidiaries got illegal advance warning of surprise safety inspections, and he implicated Massey CEO Don Blankenship in the conspiracy during his plea hearing this year.

Several investigations found miners at Upper Big Branch routinely got illegal advance warnings, giving them time to temporarily fix or disguise potentially deadly conditions underground.

Massey is now owned by Virginia-based Alpha Natural Resources. Blankenship, who retired before the merger, denies any wrongdoing.

Hughart, shackled at the ankles and wearing an orange jumpsuit, did not mention Blankenship when he spoke in court.

Hughart was fired from White Buck a month before the Upper Big Branch blast for failing a random drug test.

He'd been in court earlier Tuesday for a bond-revocation hearing following a recent arrest on drug charges. Federal probation officials said he was caught on Aug. 30 in Beckley with the painkiller oxycodone and the anti-anxiety drug alprazolam, but he had no prescription for either.

He did not contest the drug charges in court. Magistrate Clarke VanDervort revoked Hughart's $10,000 bond, and Hughart was turned over to U.S. marshals after his sentencing.

Assistant U.S. Attorney Steve Ruby acknowledged the drug offenses could affect Hughart's credibility as a witness as the government builds its case.

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