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Mars woman sues mom, bank, county detective, alleging civil rights violations

| Friday, Sept. 27, 2013, 4:45 p.m.

A Mars woman claims in a lawsuit filed Friday in federal court that her estranged mother, a detective for the District Attorney's Office, Huntington National Bank and one of its employees violated her civil rights.

Cynthia Deitrich, 54, says she was falsely arrested and maliciously prosecuted on charges of forging signatures on a 2008 home equity loan on her parents' house. An Allegheny County judge acquitted her in May.

She sued her mother, an Allegheny County detective, Huntington bank and one of its employees. Her attorney, Charles Steele, couldn't be reached for comment.

Her father died in 2009, and her relationship with her mother deteriorated afterward, the lawsuit says. In 2011, Donna Wilbert, 80, of West Deer evicted her daughter and accused her of taking out the $100,000 loan in her parents' names, the lawsuit says.

Wilbert declined comment.

Jackelyn Weibel, a detective for the Allegheny County District Attorney's Office, filed the charges based on little evidence except her mother's accusation, and the bank's negligence made the wrongful prosecution possible because an employee at its Cranberry branch notarized the loan documents without requiring the Wilberts to sign them in the notary's presence, the lawsuit says.

Mike Manko, spokesman for the District Attorney's Office, and Maureen Brown, spokeswoman for the bank, declined comment.

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