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Builder sues Steelers' Haley, says he, wife trashed Upper St. Clair home

| Tuesday, Oct. 8, 2013, 5:33 p.m.
Chaz Palla | Tribune-Review
Steelers offensive coordinator Todd Haley during practice Thursday, Aug. 1, 2013, at St. Vincent in Latrobe.
Jasmine Goldband | Tribune-Review
The rental home at 1709 Hunters Path Lane in Upper St. Clair allegedly was trashed by former tenants Todd Haley and his wife, Christine.

A McMurray homebuilder is suing Steelers offensive coordinator Todd Haley and his wife Christine, alleging the couple badly damaged a $1.4 million home they rented in Upper St. Clair and skipped out on a deal to buy it.

The damages involve a house in the upscale Fox Chase neighborhood, according to the civil complaint filed in Allegheny County Common Pleas Court. It says the Haleys rented the house for 12 months under a $72,000 annual lease that ended Aug. 14.

James McLean, a Downtown-based attorney representing the couple, said the Haleys deny all the allegations of wrongful misconduct and believe they're baseless. The couple have initiated their own claims against the homebuilder, Williamson and Jefferson Inc., McLean said in an email.

He did not specify the Haleys' claims but said the parties have agreed to go to mediation.

“The Haleys are hopeful the mediation can resolve the matter amicably, but if it does not, the Haleys will file counterclaims with the court,” McLean wrote. “We are waiting for Williamson and Jefferson to suggest mediators so that the mediation can be scheduled and see whether the matter can be resolved.”

Attorneys representing Williamson and Jefferson did not respond to requests for comment. A Steelers representative said the organization had no comment.

Todd Haley, former head coach for the Kansas City Chiefs, joined the Steelers in 2012. He and Christine Haley moved into the home with an agreement that they would buy it within 45 days after their $3.5 million home in Mission Hills, Kan., sold, according to the Williamson and Jefferson complaint.

But the Haleys did not promptly disclose the March 2013 sale of their Kansas property, which would have triggered their obligation to buy the home in Upper St. Clair, the complaint says. Rather, it says they sought to extend their lease.

When Williamson and Jefferson denied that request, lawyers wrote, the Haleys took appliances, landscaping, light fixtures and cabinetry from the home.

The couple oversaw the removal of toilets, bathtubs, water heaters, dishwashers, built-in microwave ovens, faucets and stereo speakers, according to the complaint. Filed Aug. 29, it alleges a breach of the lease.

The exact amount of damages should be determined at a trial, according to the complaint.

McLean said the items removed from the house “were all appliances and improvements the Haleys had paid for when the work was not done by professional contractors.” He said the couple did not trash the house and that the builder refused to return a $62,000 deposit that it owes them.

Todd Haley is the son of Dick Haley, a former director of player personnel for the Steelers.

Staff writer Alan Robinson contributed to this report. Adam Smeltz is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. He can be reached at 412-380-5676 or asmeltz@tribweb.com.

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