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Russian being moved to Western Pa. led extensive credit card fraud ring, prosecutors say

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Wednesday, Oct. 16, 2013, 5:42 p.m.
 

A Russian national using several nicknames, including “Evilvodka,” prowled Monster.com and Craigslist to set up an extensive network of “carders” and “reshippers” who used stolen credit card information to rip off retailers for millions of dollars, according to Pittsburgh federal court records.

A federal grand jury indicted Artur S. Gorlov, 28, of Ypsilanti, Mich., in July 2011 on a conspiracy charge and four counts of wire fraud. The indictment was sealed until Gorlov was detained on Oct. 10 by customs officials at JFK Airport in New York City as he disembarked from Aeroflot Flight No. 102 from Moscow.

Postal inspectors arrested him the next day when they confirmed he was the same Gorlov indicted by the grand jury, according to court records. He is being moved to Western Pennsylvania for prosecution.

One of the people Gorlov tried to recruit in 2008 lives in Western Pennsylvania, the indictment says.

From 2005 to 2010, the “Atlanta Alliance” created by Gorlov and other conspirators used a series of websites to direct others in how to perform their role in the widespread scheme, the indictment says.

The “carders” used stolen credit card information to buy “large volumes of merchandise” based on a list posted on a website. They had the merchandise shipped to “reshippers,” who repackaged and sent it along, based on instructions posted on several other websites.

Gorlov and other top conspirators used stolen credit card information to pay the Postal Service for the shipping and then altered the shipping labels to redirect the packages to foreign companies, costing the Postal Service both the credit card chargebacks and the redirection fees, the indictment says.

The conspirators sold the goods through another website, the indictment says.

Brian Bowling is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. He can be reached at 412-325-4301 or bbowling@tribweb.com.

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