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Ellis School recognized for 'design thinking'

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Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2013, 4:57 p.m.
 

The Ellis School was named an educational leader in “design thinking” by the Institute of Design at Stanford University, joining fewer than 50 schools recognized nationwide.

Design thinking encourages students to research and learn by reading, conducting interviews and observing — anything that sparks creativity and critical thinking at deeper levels than listening to lectures or taking notes.

Stanford's K12 Lab Network established the honor to track the global design thinking movement in education, according to its website.

Design thinking challenges students to solve real-world problems, a concept embraced by Ellis' director of instructional and informational technologies Lisa Abel-Palmieri. Students interpret their findings and come up with possible solutions for experimentation and critique.

Palmieri co-founded a weekly Twitter-based conversation on technology innovation for educators. She invites anyone interested in design thinking to join the discussion at 9 p.m. Wednesdays with the hashtag #dtk12chat.

Add Megan Harris to your Google+ circles.

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