TribLIVE

| News

 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Judge rules for Fox Chapel schools in tree nut allergy case

Email Newsletters

Click here to sign up for one of our email newsletters.

Daily Photo Galleries

'American Coyotes' Series

Traveling by Jeep, boat and foot, Tribune-Review investigative reporter Carl Prine and photojournalist Justin Merriman covered nearly 2,000 miles over two months along the border with Mexico to report on coyotes — the human traffickers who bring illegal immigrants into the United States. Most are Americans working for money and/or drugs. This series reports how their operations have a major impact on life for residents and the environment along the border — and beyond.

Tuesday, Nov. 5, 2013, 3:33 p.m.
 

Fox Chapel Area School District was not deliberately indifferent to a former Fairview Elementary student's severe allergy to tree nuts, a federal judge ruled on Tuesday.

“On the contrary, the factual allegations support the conclusion that Fox Chapel was working diligently, although perhaps imperfectly, in attempting to accommodate T.F.'s disability,” U.S. District Judge Arthur Schwab said in ruling for the school district in a lawsuit brought by the former student's parents. The student was identified in the lawsuit only by initials.

The student's parents claimed that the district violated their son's civil rights during the 2010-11 school year by failing to develop an adequate plan to protect him from exposure. They withdrew their son from the school in December 2010 and enrolled him in a cyber charter school, according to court records.

Their attorney, Jeffrey Ruder, declined comment.

Schwab ruled that the district devised four different plans and made several modifications to those plans after consulting with the student's parents and doctor, but the parents rejected all of them.

The judge rejected the parents' claim that the district retaliated against them by filing a truancy action when their son missed more than 11 days of school without an excuse.

State law required the district to file the charge, and there's no “pattern of antagonism” in the district's communications with the student's parents, Schwab said.

Brian Bowling is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. He can be reached at 412-325-4301 or bbowling@tribweb.com.

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.

 

 

 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Stories

  1. Penguins trade Sutter to Canucks, sign free agent center Fehr
  2. Le’Veon Bell’s suspension cut by one game
  3. Pitt’s Blair faces court date on DUI charge
  4. Five Baldwin men face trial in beating of black man
  5. Brady’s suspension upheld by Goodell
  6. Videos spur dozens to protest outside Pittsburgh Planned Parenthood
  7. Judge lets New Kensington Ten Commandments monument stand
  8. Steelers RB Archer trying to catch up after tough rookie season
  9. Inside the Steelers: Ventrone suffers right ankle injury
  10. IOC urges US to come up with another bid city for 2024 Games
  11. Bloomfield Bridge lanes to be closed starting Wednesday