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Lincoln Park charter school seeks new CEO

| Wednesday, Nov. 27, 2013, 1:36 p.m.

Nearly three months after its CEO stepped down, the Lincoln Park Performing Arts Charter School in Midland is seeking a chief executive to lead it through an expansion/growth program.

Rebecca Manning, CEO of the Beaver County performing arts charter school since its founding in 2006, resigned in September in the wake of a federal fraud indictment against school founder Nick Trombetta.

Manning, who also was an executive at one of Trombetta's management companies, was not charged in the indictment, nor were operations at Lincoln Park questioned. She cited unspecified personal reasons in her resignation from her position that carried a base salary of $118,675.

More than 600 students in grades 7-12 from 58 school districts are enrolled at the school, which focuses on academics and pre-professional training in music, theater, dance, creative writing, health science arts and media arts.

“LPPACS seeks a lively, forward-thinking, collaborative and compassionate individual to take on the important responsibility of directing a high quality academic curriculum that is aligned with unique, first-class artistic training and education in the performing arts,” Lincoln Park School Board President Chris Shovlin said in a statement.

Applications are being accepted through Dec. 10.

A full job description is post on the school's website, www.lppacs.org. It notes that the new CEO “must have significant hands-on teaching and school administrative experience.”

Debra Erdley is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. She can be reached at 412-320-7996 or derdley@tribweb.com.

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