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Former PPG executive arraigned on second-degree murder charges

| Friday, Dec. 27, 2013, 5:00 p.m.

LEBANON, N.H. — A former Fortune 500 executive who worked at PPG Industries was arraigned on Friday on second-degree murder charges in a crash that killed a Vermont couple expecting their first child in January.

Robert Dellinger, 53, of Sunapee, N.H., told police that he was depressed and was trying to kill himself on Dec. 7 when he drove his pickup across an Interstate 89 median and into an oncoming car.

Police say the truck became airborne and sheared off the top of the couple's car, killing them instantly. Their unborn child did not survive.

He was arraigned on two counts of second-degree murder in the deaths of Jason Timmons, 29, and Amanda Murphy, 24, who was eight months pregnant.

Dellinger suffered cuts on his head and face and at first was charged with two counts of reckless manslaughter.

According to prosecutors, Dellinger told troopers that he had argued with his wife over medication he was taking for depression and was driving around when he decided to commit suicide.

“Everybody's trying very hard to hold up,” said his lawyer, Peter Decato. “As you might imagine, it's very difficult for everybody. You see families agonizing over their lost loved ones and a family agonizing over the loss of liberty of their loved one.”

Dellinger is being held without bail until a probable-cause hearing on Jan. 14, after which a bail hearing can be scheduled.

A conviction on second-degree murder carries a sentence of up to life in prison.

Dellinger's résumé as a top financial executive for corporate giants took him to locations from Schenectady, N.Y., to Singapore. His last two jobs were in Western Pennsylvania, including a two-year stint as chief financial officer for PPG Industries. He left in 2011 because of health issues.

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