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Head of state employee pension system to resign

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By The Associated Press
Monday, Dec. 30, 2013, 4:00 p.m.
 

HARRISBURG — The chairman of Pennsylvania's $26.5 billion state employee pension system said on Monday he is stepping down, partly because of state Treasurer Rob McCord's criticism of the handling of allegations of possible misconduct against its chief investment officer.

Nicholas Maiale, who has chaired the State Employees' Retirement System for 21 of his 28 years on its board, said he decided to leave because he was largely responsible for hiring the investment chief and because McCord's comments have inflamed the situation.

The allegations were “not handled well by the governor's office, and the noise level got too high” once McCord went public with his criticism, said Maiale, a former state representative from Philadelphia.

Maiale, 62, whose term on the board expired on Dec. 16, said he agreed to leave the board when conferring with Gov. Tom Corbett's office. Corbett did not reappoint Maiale when his term expired.

“I think we all agree that it's time to move on,” Maiale said.

Corbett spokesman Jay Pagni said his boss did not ask for Maiale's resignation, but that Maiale's characterization of the governor's motives is strictly his point of view. Pagni could not give a timetable to replace him.

McCord, an elected official who serves on the pension board, has said lawyers working for the Republican governor mishandled their investigation of the allegations against SERS investment chief Anthony S. “Tony” Clark by waiting two months to inform the board.

McCord, one of eight Democrats seeking the nomination to challenge Corbett's re-election bid in 2014, has criticized Maiale's leadership as board chairman.

The allegations involve the possibility that Clark used his state computer to do day trading and hid information about a troubled investment from the board, according to the governor's Office of General Counsel.

Clark, who is not charged with any crime, plans to retire from his $270,000-a-year job on Tuesday. His lawyer has said that he moved up his retirement date because it would be difficult to do his job while an outside lawyer hired by the board looks into the allegations.

 

 
 


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