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Schwartz says she raised $6.5M for governor's race

| Thursday, Jan. 2, 2014, 11:09 a.m.
U.S. Rep. Allyson Schwartz is serving her fifth term representing Pennsylvania’s 13th Congressional District.

HARRISBURG — U.S. Rep. Allyson Schwartz's campaign for governor said Thursday that she raised $6.5 million in 2013 as she vies for the Democratic nomination to challenge Republican Gov. Tom Corbett's re-election.

Schwartz's statement made her the second of eight Democratic gubernatorial candidates in Pennsylvania to reveal a fundraising tally.

Schwartz's campaign spokesman said the $6.5 million she raised includes $3.1 million transferred from her federal campaign committee. Her campaign would not say how much of that money was unspent. The state allows candidates until Jan. 31 to file detailed reports of their contributions and expenditures for 2013.

Last month, York businessman and former state Revenue Secretary Tom Wolf said he had raised nearly $2.9 million, in addition to the $10 million of his own money Wolf has said he would contribute to his primary campaign.

The amount of campaign contributions a Democratic candidate reports is an important sign of the strength of the challenge they will pose to Corbett.

Corbett has not released his fundraising tally for 2013 and may face a primary challenge from conservative activist Bob Guzzardi, a businessman and retired lawyer from the Philadelphia suburb of Ardmore.

In any case, candidates and campaign strategists expect that the eventual winner of the Nov. 4 general election will need to raise in excess of $20 million.

The primary is May 20. The deadline for candidates to file nominating petitions to get on the primary ballot is March 11. All candidates for governor are required at a minimum to gather the signatures of 2,000 voters, including 100 from each of 10 counties.

Other declared Democratic candidates for the May 20 primary are state Treasurer Rob McCord, former state environmental protection secretaries John Hanger and Katie McGinty, Allentown Mayor Ed Pawlowski, Lebanon County Commissioner Jo Ellen Litz and Pentecostal minister Max Myers.

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