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Notorious Ravenstahl trash cans will be a thing of past in Pittsburgh

| Thursday, Jan. 16, 2014, 1:42 p.m.
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review
JCA GARBAGE 13 02 A new garbage can on the corner of South 13th and East Carson Streets bears the logo 'Taking Care of Business, Luke Ravenstahl, Mayor' on Thursday, February 12, 2009. The new garbage cans cost $1000 apiece. (Joe Appel/Tribune-Review) Boren Story 2/13/09

Mayor Bill Peduto intends to rub out references to former Mayor Luke Ravenstahl from trash cans across Pittsburgh.

Peduto on Thursday issued his first executive order, banning city politicians from embossing their names on walls, toilets or any place they might appear for political purposes. It requires the removal of names of any former city officials from public property.

The order excludes such things as office stationery and doors. Property where someone is honored or memorialized, such as the Mayor Bob O'Connor golf course in Schenley Park, is exempt.

“It was obvious during the Ravenstahl administration, whenever there was an election year, there was a use of assets in order to promote his campaign or administration,” Peduto said. “The city's assets are owned by taxpayers.”

Ravenstahl could not be reached for comment. His administration in 2009 purchased 252 steel trash cans at $1,000 apiece that prominently displayed his name. Ravenstahl's name appears on public recycling bins and signs heralding, “Mayor Luke Ravenstahl's 311 Response Line.”

Peduto vowed that his name will not be “printed, painted or engraved” on city property. It will be marked with identifying information and the city seal, he said.

Bob Bauder is a Trib Total Media staff writer.

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