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Digital information specialist to visit Ferrante in jail

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Friday, Feb. 21, 2014, 1:45 p.m.
 

An Allegheny County judge on Friday permitted an attorney who specializes in computer evidence to visit the University of Pittsburgh researcher accused of fatally poisoning his wife with cyanide.

Common Pleas President Judge Jeffrey A. Manning said Peter Mansmann, CEO of Precise Inc., can visit Dr. Robert Ferrante at the Allegheny County Jail to review digital information stored on a computer at the jail. Ferrante's defense requested that he be allowed to have a computer to review information on his case.

Although Manning's order did not specify what Mansmann would be doing at the jail, it is likely he will help assist Ferrante in viewing the digital evidence prosecutors discovered on a laptop found at his Schenley Farms home.

Mansmann did not return a call. A gag order has been issued in the case. Ferrante's attorney William Difenderfer and prosecutors did not return calls.

Ferrante, 65, is accused of poisoning his UPMC neurologist wife, Autumn Marie Klein, 41, on April 17. Paramedics found Klein collapsed in their home, and she died at UPMC Presbyterian hospital on April 20.

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