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CMU prof nets National Science Foundation award to reduce energy consumption

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Tuesday, March 4, 2014, 3:57 p.m.
 

The National Science Foundation has awarded a Carnegie Mellon University professor a $600,000 NSF Career Award to develop new tools to reduce energy consumption in communications and big data computation networks, CMU officials announced on Tuesday.

The award recognizes the work of Pulkit Grover, an assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering at CMU. Grover's work focused on reducing energy consumption among the technologies that experts say eventually will consume 15 percent of the world's energy. Grover hopes to develop ways to reduce their total energy consumption by as much as half.

The $600,000 award will be used to fund Grover's research at CMU over the next five years.

“This award will help us arrive at radically new strategies to reduce energy in communication and computation networks. These include big-energy networks in data centers, but also smaller-energy indoor communication networks and those in brain-machine interfaces” Grover said in a statement released with the award announcement.

Debra Erdley is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. She can be reached at 412-320-7996 or derdley@tribweb.com.

 

 

 
 


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