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Council takes first step toward moving more money to pave Pittsburgh roads

| Wednesday, May 7, 2014, 12:06 p.m.

Pittsburgh City Council agreed unanimously on Wednesday to spend more money this year on paving winter-ravaged streets.

Council gave preliminary approval to Mayor Bill Peduto's plan for moving $1.8 million from capital projects — including dog parks, spray parks and firefighter equipment — to street paving. Council is scheduled for a final vote next week.

Peduto Deputy Chief of Staff John Fournier told council members that the cash would be redirected from completed projects or from budget line items that have an excess from prior years.

“We went through our prior-year bond funds and identified funds that could be reallocated,” Fournier said.

Nearly 64 percent of Pittsburgh's 866 miles of asphalt streets have the lowest road surface rating: zero. The city budgeted $7.2 million to pave about 29 miles this year. The extra money would permit paving 40 miles and bring total spending to about $9 million.

Public Works Director Mike Gable said his department used a computerized system to rate each street, with input from street inspectors and complaints from residents, to determine the 2014 paving schedule.

“All that builds into what streets get done,” he said.

Peduto's street is not on the list.

Bob Bauder is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. He can be reached at 412-765-2312 or bbauder@tribweb.com.

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