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Pittsburgh nonprofits robust financially, report says

| Tuesday, June 3, 2014, 11:40 p.m.

The biggest nonprofit groups in the Pittsburgh area are rolling in dough, according to a report released on Tuesday by a charity watchdog.

The report from Charity Navigator included 50 of the biggest nonprofits in the area. It ranked them first nationally in financial health and fifth overall when including transparency and accountability.

“Pittsburgh charities have quite a healthy rainy day fund, with roughly a year-and-a-half worth of funds on hand,” Sandra Miniutti, vice president of Charity Navigator in Glen Rock, N.J.

The report gathered data from the nonprofits' tax documents and websites.

Miniutti said Pittsburgh nonprofits received high marks for being financially efficient, with the bulk of money they raised going to their missions. Last year, Pittsburgh ranked 14th in financial health and seventh in the overall ranking.

“It looks like charities in Pittsburgh were able to bring in more revenue,” Miniutti said. “That's certainly commendable for nonprofit leaders in this tough economy.”

Pittsburgh was 26th of 30 markets surveyed in transparency and accountability. It fell behind the national average in the percentage of nonprofits listing board members and making audits and federal income tax returns available.

Among the nonprofits in the report are Carnegie Mellon University, the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra, the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust and United Way of Allegheny County.

St. Louis was first in the overall ranking. Philadelphia was 13th.

Bill Zlatos is a Trib Total Media staff writer.

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