Share This Page

Home Depot donation funds repairs to Pittsburgh vets' homes

| Wednesday, June 11, 2014, 1:37 p.m.

When rain hit Hazelwood on Wednesday afternoon, Norbert Malloy could sit and talk without worrying about catching drips from his leaky roof.

Malloy, 79, is getting his roof shingled and other work done through a program that pays for improvements to veterans' homes.

“These guys are doing a great job,” said Malloy, an Air Force veteran. “The roof was slate. It held up fine until the last couple of winters when it started leaking.”

The Sustainable Home Improvement Partnership, a collaboration of volunteers, nonprofits and Pittsburgh agencies, plans to improve the homes of 27 other veterans this year.

Mayor Bill Peduto and City Councilman Corey O'Connor announced on Wednesday that the Home Depot Foundation is funding the program with a $200,000 grant. Volunteers do most of the work.

“We recruit volunteers from all walks of life — church groups, companies, charitable organizations, Lions Clubs, you name it — throughout the year to work with us and give a day of their time,” said Alan Sisco, deputy director of Rebuilding Together Pittsburgh, which is administering the grant.

Since January 2012, the partnership has provided more than 2,000 volunteers, leveraged more than $1 million in cash and in-kind donations, and repaired and weatherized about 150 homes, according to the mayor's office.

In addition to the roof, Malloy is getting renovations to his kitchen and bathroom and landscaping. He said he cannot afford to pay for the work on his own.

Malloy served in the Air Force from 1954 to 1962.

Bob Bauder is a Trib Total Media staff writer. Reach him at 412-765-2312 or bbauder@tribweb.com.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.