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Developer hopes to build 15-story hotel next to Duquesne Incline

| Tuesday, July 8, 2014, 3:23 p.m.

A Bridgeville developer plans to build a 159-room, 15-story hotel next to the Duquesne Incline at the foot of Mt. Washington.

“All of the rooms will have a view” of the three rivers and Point State Park, said Keith M. Andreyko, an architect on the Forza Group project who briefed the city's planning commission on Tuesday.

The Hampton Inn & Suites at 1217 W. Carson St. would feature a three-level parking garage, an observation deck for guests on the 15th floor and amenities including a pool, an exercise facility and a continental breakfast dining area.

Andreyko couldn't provide an estimated cost for the project but said the hotel will take about 18 months to build once the project receives necessary approvals. A date hasn't been set for a planning commission vote.

Forza plans two other hotels in the city, including a 110-room Holiday Inn on Fort Pitt Boulevard, Downtown, and a 123-room Home2 by Hilton in the South Side, said William Sittig Jr. of Sittig, Cortese & Wratcher LLC, who represents the developer. Sittig said he was notified on Tuesday that neighbors of the proposed Holiday Inn project intend to challenge those plans, previously approved by the planning commission, in Allegheny County Common Pleas Court.

The planning commission was briefed on a proposal to require permits to park in a residential area of the South Side, adjacent to the growing SouthSide Works retail complex.

The residential area sits roughly between East Carson and Mary streets and 22nd and 29th streets, and has 618 on-street parking spaces, said Ashley Holloway, a city neighborhood planner. He said a survey during a recent six-hour period showed just 26 percent of spaces were occupied by people who live in the area, based on a check of addresses registered with all parked cars' license plate numbers.

The proposal would require motorists to have a permit to park there from noon to midnight on Mondays through Saturdays — though people without permits would be able to park in the area for up to two hours. The city has 34 residential areas that require parking permits, including two in the South Side.

Holloway said the survey showed people in about four-fifths of the area's households support the proposal, but many who own businesses or work in the area oppose it, along with some residents who don't want to pay $20 a year to purchase a permit.

A public hearing is expected to be held on the proposal in two weeks.

Tom Fontaine is a staff writer for Trib Total Media.

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