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89 killed in suicide blast in east Afghanistan

| Tuesday, July 15, 2014, 9:56 a.m.
Afghan doctors assist civilians who were wounded when a suicide bomber detonated his explosives-packed vehicle near a crowded market and a mosque, in the main hospital in Sharan, capital of Paktika province, Afghanistan, Tuesday, July 15, 2014. An Afghan general said scores of people were killed and over 40 wounded in a bombing in the country's eastern Paktika province. He said the military is providing helicopters and ambulances to transport the victims to the provincial capital, Sharan. Taliban sent a statement to media denying their involvement in the attack.

KABUL, Afghanistan — A suicide bomber blew up a car packed with explosives near a busy market and a mosque in eastern Afghanistan on Tuesday, killing 89 people and wounding more than 40 in one of the deadliest attacks since the 2001 U.S.-led invasion.

The attack in the town of Urgun in Paktika province brutally underscored the country's instability as foreign troops prepare to leave by the end of the year and feuding politicians in Kabul work to form a new government after a disputed presidential election.

Gen. Mohammad Zahir Azimi, the Defense Ministry spokesman, said the bomber detonated his explosives-laden vehicle as he drove by the crowded market in the remote town in Urgun district, close to the border with Pakistan.

The military was providing helicopters and ambulances to transport the victims to the provincial capital, Sharan, and so far 42 wounded have been moved to hospitals there, he said, adding that the explosion destroyed more than 20 shops and dozens of vehicles.

No one immediately claimed responsibility for the attack, and the Taliban sent a statement to media denying involvement, saying they “strongly condemn attacks on local people.”

Many of the victims were buried under the rubble, said Mohammad Reza Kharoti, the administrative chief of Urgun district.

“It was a very brutal suicide attack against poor civilians,” he said. “There was no military base nearby.”

The bombing was also the first major attack since a weekend deal between the two Afghan presidential contenders brokered by U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry averted a dangerous rift in the country's troubled democracy following last month's disputed runoff.

One of the two, former Finance Minister Ashraf Ghani Ahmadzai, told The Associated Press on Monday that he would meet his rival, former Foreign Minister Abdullah Abdullah, on Tuesday to begin working out the framework for the next government, with participation from both camps and all ethnic and religious communities.

But the election and the weekend deal between the two rivals have had no visible impact on the security situation in the country, which sees near-daily attacks.

Hours before the Paktika blast, a roadside bomb in eastern Kabul ripped through a minivan carrying seven employees of the media office of the presidential palace, killing two of the passengers.

The explosion struck as the vehicle was taking the palace staffers to work, said Gul Agha Hashimi, the chief of criminal investigations with the Kabul police.

Five other people, including the driver, were wounded, said Hashimi, speaking to reporters at the site of the blast. He added that one passenger was unharmed.

Kabul police spokesman Hashmat Stanikzai said it was a remotely detonated device planted along the median of a main road.

Taliban spokesman Zabihullah Mujahid claimed responsibility for that attack in a statement sent to reporters.

In a separate incident, seven police officers, including a district counter-terrorism director, and six border guards were killed when Taliban insurgents attacked a post on the border with Pakistan in the eastern Khost province, said Mubariz Mohammad Zadran, spokesman for the provincial governor.

Zadran said the attack set off an hours-long gunbattle that left 34 insurgents and a local man dead. “The majority of the insurgents killed in the clash are Pakistani citizens,” Zadran said.

Elsewhere in the country, two police officers were killed by a bomb concealed on a parked motorbike inside the southern city of Kandahar, said Zia Durani, spokesman for the Kandahar police chief.

Roadside bombings are a major threat to both Afghan security forces and civilians across the country. Such attacks have escalated as the Taliban intensify their campaign ahead of the U.S.-led foreign forces' withdrawal by the end of the year.

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