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Monroeville oxycodone dealer to spend 10 years in prison

| Friday, July 25, 2014, 6:11 p.m.

A Monroeville man who moved his oxycodone ring from South Florida to Western Pennsylvania in 2010, hid money under his father's name and led a lavish lifestyle will spend 10 years in prison, a federal judge ruled on Friday.

Jason Weitzner, 45, pleaded guilty in April to drug conspiracy and money laundering. U.S. District Judge Nora Barry Fischer also sentenced him to six years of probation and ordered the forfeiture of his bank accounts.

Weitzner, the owner of a Squirrel Hill head shop called J&S Glass on Murray Avenue, started dealing in oxycodone as early as 2008 in Florida, prosecutors say.

Between 2010 and 2012 he brought to the Pittsburgh area more than 28,000 oxycodone pills, Assistant U.S. Attorney Eric Rosen said in court documents.

Weitzner hired drug addicts to travel to Florida where they obtained and filled painkiller prescriptions and then flew back to Pittsburgh, he said.

“Defendant himself saw multiple doctors each month and sold the pills that he obtained from the doctors,” Rosen said. “Even though defendant spent hundreds of dollars to obtain a large oxycodone prescription, he could make thousands of dollars selling the pills he obtained.”

Bank records show Weitzner deposited about $1.1 million between 2008 and 2012, in addition to whatever money he kept in cash, he said.

Weitzner used the money to finance “an extravagant lifestyle filled with hotels, restaurants, clothing and golf,” Rosen said.

He used his father's name and his business to hide drug proceeds in bank accounts in Florida, New Jersey and Pennsylvania, prosecutors said. Lawrence Weitzner, 73, is serving two years in prison for conspiring with his son to launder the money.

Brian Bowling is a Trib Total Media staff writer. Reach him at 412-325-4301 or bbowling@tribweb.com.

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