TribLIVE

| News

 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Newsmaker: Moni McIntyre

Email Newsletters

Click here to sign up for one of our email newsletters.
Caption info: Moni McIntyre served as a panelist for a Sept. 11 commemorative conference at the Smithsonian Institution. The Sisters of Selma conference devoted discussion to six Roman Catholic nuns who marched in protest against the brutal beatings of non-violent social justice protestors in Selma, Ala., on March 7, 1965. She is rector of the Episcopal Church of the Holy Cross in Homewood, and assistant professor in the Graduate Center for Social and Public Policy at Duquesne University.

'American Coyotes' Series

Traveling by Jeep, boat and foot, Tribune-Review investigative reporter Carl Prine and photojournalist Justin Merriman covered nearly 2,000 miles over two months along the border with Mexico to report on coyotes — the human traffickers who bring illegal immigrants into the United States. Most are Americans working for money and/or drugs. This series reports how their operations have a major impact on life for residents and the environment along the border — and beyond.

By Bill Vidonic
Tuesday, Sept. 18, 2012, 12:01 a.m.
 

Noteworthy: Panelist for the Sisters of Selma conference at the Smithsonian Institution, a discussion by six Roman Catholic nuns who marched in protest against the brutal beatings of non-violent protesters in Selma, Ala., on March 7, 1965.

Age: 64

Residence: Oakland

Occupation: Assistant professor in the Graduate Center for Social and Public Policy at Duquesne University and rector of the Episcopal Church of the Holy Cross in Homewood.

Education: Master's in English from Eastern Michigan University; master's in religious studies from the University of Windsor, Ontario; master's in divinity from SS. Cyril & Methodius Seminary in Orchard Lake, Mich.; doctorate in moral theology/Christian ethics from the University of St. Michael's College at the University of Toronto.

Background: Served in the Navy from 1979 to 2008, retiring as a captain; was a nun from 1966-98, before she was ordained as an Episcopal priest in 2000. She regularly teaches physicians, dentists and other health care professionals at the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Md.

Quote: "The best part of the whole day was being on the panel with 88-year-old Sister Antona Ebo, the African-American sister who was in the 1965 march, and Dr. Cedric Bright, current president of the National Medical Association. It was all of my lives coming together."

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.

 

 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Allegheny

  1. Peduto blasts Wolf’s plan to borrow $3B to shore up pensions
  2. Woman crashes car at Pittsburgh federal building after high-speed chase
  3. Pittsburgh is planning to add network of bike lanes through Oakland
  4. Fugitive arrested at Plum motel on drug, gun charges
  5. Judge adds 2 years to sentence of Baldwin Borough man acquitted of murder
  6. School credit ratings a problem for several in Western Pennsylvania
  7. 2 firefighters injured in Millvale house fire
  8. Public Utility Commission will consider fare hikes
  9. Thief’s attorney blames Rivers Casino; judge isn’t swayed
  10. Man shot several times in Allentown neighborhood
  11. Newsmaker: Megan Cicconi