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Newsmaker: Da LeMon

| Saturday, Oct. 6, 2012, 12:02 a.m.
Dana LaMon In celebration of Disabilities Awareness Month, Dana LaMon, 60, of Lancaster, Calif., will give the keynote address at 8 a.m. on Oct. 24 to a gathering of the region's employers at Rivers Casino. Hosted by Life’sWork of Western Pennsylvania, the nonprofit that helps handicapped adults become independent and productive workers, LaMon will speak about how his blindness didn’t stop him from becoming a legal leader and popular motivational speaker

Dana LaMon

Noteworthy: LaMon will give the keynote address at an 8 a.m. Oct. 24 breakfast at the Rivers Casino to commemorate Disabilities Awareness Month. The event is hosted by Life'sWork of Western Pennsylvania, which helps adults with disabilities become independent and productive. LaMon will speak about how blindness didn't stop him from a career in law.

Age: 60

Residence: Lancaster, Calif.

Education: Bachelor of Science in mathematics from Yale University in 1974; law degree from the University of Southern California in 1977. Occupation: Retired administrative judge; author and motivational speaker.

Background: LaMon began to lose his sight at the age of 4. He was admitted to the California State Bar in 1978. He worked as an aide to a Los Angeles councilwoman, helmed the Disabled Resources Center, an independent living facility in Long Beach, Calif., and was appointed as an administrative judge hearing disability cases in 1981. He won the 1992 World Championship of Public Speaking from Toastmasters International.

Quote: “People who are disabled are people. That's why we focus on the word ‘people' and ‘disabled' second. They want to live meaningful lives and make meaningful contributions to society.”

— Carl Prine

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